Plurrrr

a tumblelog
Wed 22 Jul 2020

tumblelog is now available under the MIT license

In order to add tumblelog, the SSG (static site generator) I wrote to create this blog, to StaticGen; a list of static site generators, I had to add a single clear OSS license.

For version 4.0.3 of tumblelog and earlier the license for the Perl version was:

This program is free software; you can redistribute it and/or modify it under the same terms as Perl itself.

and for the Python version:

This program is free software; you can redistribute it and/or modify it under the same terms as Python itself.

In the afternoon I decided to bring all files belonging to the tumblelog project under the MIT license, added a LICENSE file to the project and bumped the version to 4.0.4 😜.

I also added a project description for both the Perl and Python version of tumblelog to a fork of staticgen and did a pull request. If I did all correctly, hopefully in the near future tumblelog will appear on the list.

The tumblelog project is available via GitHub. Feedback is welcome.

Fun With Simulated Typestate in Python 3.8

Typestate is an augmentation to a type system which lets us model objects which have defined states, with certain operations only available in given states, and where operations may alter the state of the object in a defined way. “True” typestate support is quite uncommon in programming languages, but we can use the techniques we’ll illustrate shortly to simulate typestate by turning each state into a distinct type, avoiding duplication by making use of polymorphic (“generic”) types.

Source: Fun With Simulated Typestate in Python 3.8, an article by Derrick W. Turk.

Setting up a Linux Workstation for Software Development

Still, as with any other operating system, optimizing a Linux workstation for software development requires some configuration. In this post, I will present tools and concepts that I think are very helpful, but overlooked by many. I will try to show only things that are not specific to my workflows, but rather useful for almost any software engineer, DevOps specialist, or just regular productivity enthusiast. Naturally, many of the configuration options and tools covered in this post are subjective. Nevertheless, I am confident that my suggestions are a good place to start. They have served me well over the years and I continually try to optimize my setup. Hence, I very much appreciate any improvement you might suggest.

Source: Setting up a Linux Workstation for Software Development, an article by Thomas Kainrad.